Engineering

Student participating in the Oaks Christian institute of Engineering will learn to analyze, model and design engineering systems, develop the skills to solve complex problems, and master the use of software and prototyping tools used in the industry.

The courses are designed to cover the primary topics of university engineering programs, but also include the philosophy of engineering and introduction to the typical industry design review process.

Introduction to Engineering

Introduction to Engineering satisfies the Academic Technology graduation requirement. This course is designed to introduce students to the philosophy of engineering, project and time management, and the typical industry design review process. Students will learn fundamental concepts, tools, and processes from each of the four pathways of the OCS Institute of Engineering: Mechanical, Electrical, Aerospace, and Software Engineering.

This is a project-based course in which students will design, build, refine, and test solutions to complex problems based on real-world engineering applications. Additionally, students will develop tool literacy by utilizing a variety of tools to complete projects, such as bandsaws, drill presses, breadboards, Arduino microcontrollers, etc. 

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: Algebra I

Aerospace Engineering 1

This course is designed to cover the primary topics of university engineering programs, but also includes philosophy of engineering and the typical industry design review process. The course builds on the concepts introduced in the Introduction to Engineering course and includes more calculations and design depth. Aerospace Engineering I is the first half of a two-year Aerospace Engineering elective program that provides an introduction to university-level aerospace engineering concepts without using calculus.

Aerospace Engineering I is a course for students who want to approach working with rockets and aircraft as engineers. In the past, students have worked on custom rockets, remote-control airplanes, and weather-balloons capturing images at the edge of space.  Some of the topics to be covered include kinematics, numerical methods, aerodynamics, atmospheric sciences, systems engineering, and project design.  Enrollment in this course includes participation in the Team America Rocketry Challenge (TARC), a national rocketry contest, and field trips to remote launch locations and educational partners.

This is a hands-on course that involves extensive use of algebra, physics, and critical thinking to solve real-world problems. Students must be self-motivated, mature, and adaptable to a dynamic learning environment.

Prerequisites: Geometry, Introduction to Engineering
Corequisites: Algebra II, Physics (High School)

Electrical Engineering 1

This course is designed to cover the primary topics of university engineering programs, but also includes philosophy of engineering and the typical industry design review process. The course builds on the concepts introduced in the Introduction to Engineering course and includes more calculations and design depth. Electrical Engineering I is the first half of a two-year Electrical Engineering elective program that provides an introduction to university-level electrical engineering concepts without using calculus.

Electrical Engineering I is a course for students who want to design the electronic devices that are integral to daily lives. Throughout the class, students will learn how to analyze, design, build, and test simple electronic circuits and devices. . Topics include electricity and electronics basics; component selection, breadboarding, and soldering; capacitors, inductors, oscillating circuits, and filters; radio transmitters and receivers; alternating current and AC/DC conversion; transistors; operational amplifiers and feedback circuits; and basic digital electronics. 

This is a hands-on course that involves extensive use of algebra, physics, and critical thinking to solve real-world problems. Students must be self-motivated, mature, and adaptable to a dynamic learning environment.

Prerequisites: Geometry, Introduction to Engineering
Corequisites: Algebra II, Physics (High School)

Mechanical Engineering 1

This course is designed to cover the primary topics of university engineering programs, but also includes philosophy of engineering and the typical industry design review process.  The course builds on the concepts introduced in the Introduction to Engineering course and includes more calculations and design depth. Mechanical Engineering I is the first half of a two-year Mechanical Engineering elective program that provides an introduction to university-level mechanical engineering concepts without using calculus.

Mechanical Engineering I is a course for students who want to solve the world’s problems using the science of engineering. Students will learn statics, friction, heat transfer, project management, and using models and engineering drawing. These concepts are taught from a real-world application perspective for preparation in fields including aerospace, food and water processing, prosthetics, structures, manufacturing, and transportation. 

This is a hands-on course that involves extensive use of algebra, physics, and critical thinking to solve real-world problems.  Students must be self-motivated, mature, and adaptable to a dynamic learning environment.

Prerequisites: Geometry, Introduction to Engineering
Corequisites: Algebra II, Physics (High School)

Software Engineering I (AP Computer Science Principles)

Software Engineering I prepares students to take the AP Computer Science Principles exam. The course is designed to cover the primary topics of university engineering programs, but also includes philosophy of software development and the typical industry development process. The course builds on the concepts introduced in the Introduction to Engineering course and includes more calculations and design depth. Software Engineering I is the first half of a two-year Software Engineering elective program that provides an introduction to university-level software engineering concepts without using calculus.

Software Engineering I is a course for students who want to design and create computer programs and websites. Students will learn to design, implement, test, and debug programs using various programming languages (Python, JavaScript, and HTML/CSS). Topics include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and selecting the appropriate programming language(s) for a project. Students will also explore the ethical and social implications of computing. 

This is a project-based course that involves extensive use of algebra and critical thinking to solve real-world problems. Students must be self-motivated, mature, and adaptable to a dynamic learning environment.

Prerequisites: Geometry, Introduction to Engineering
Corequisites: Algebra II, Physics (High School)

Physics, 9th Grade Physics Honors, and Advanced Physics

Physics - Physics is the study of relationships between motion and energy.The course offered at Oaks Christian High School is a full-year laboratory-based college-preparatory course covering three general units: kinematics, energy, and waves. A number of laboratory sessions will be completed, some of which will use calculator and computer-based instrumentation for the gathering and organizing of data.

9th Grade Physics Honors - As we develop a physics-first track for science—designed to appeal to students for whom physical science experiments appeal—we are opening the door for higher-level physics courses in upper grades. This class covers the material of Physics, but moves at an accelerated rate and is aimed towards students with high-level interest in pursuing further study, therefore covering topics that will be built upon in later years.

Advanced Physics - This is a weighted honors course that speaks to the content of the Advanced Physics 1 exam, but moves at a pace and in a direction that the teacher determines is best for the students rather than the College Board. While students are encouraged to take the AP Physics 1 exam at the end of the year, they will not be required to do so. Furthermore, students should be aware that they are signing up for an inquiry-based, project/lab-heavy course that pushes them to develop their observation, data collection and analysis, and laboratory skills while also teaching them how to use machinery tools and conduct real world problem solving.

Advanced Placement Physics 2

Advanced Placement Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore these topics: fluids; thermodynamics; electrical force, field, and potential; electric circuits; magnetism and electromagnetic induction; geometric and physical optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.

OC Online Computer Literacy

As the title states, this is an online class that provides students with an opportunity to learn how to learn online and to learn how to use the technology available at Oaks Christian School in order to successfully navigate their future assignments, projects and presentations. Upon completion of this course, students will have been instructed in the following topics: Oaks Christian email access, typing, virtual desktop access, cloud storage, Google Drive and Docs, computer hardware and operating systems, cyberbullying, social media, academic honesty and research citation, MS Word and MS Excel, digital photography basics, and MS PowerPoint/Prezi creations. Students meet weekly with a teacher via video conferencing for in-person instruction to clarify the course content and receive live feedback.

OC Online Introduction to Computer Languages

This online class provides students with instruction on networks, internet, computer software, introduction to programming, and introduction to HTML, JavaScript, XML, Visual Basic, and C++. The course is for students who already have a high level of independent problem-solving skills and who are very comfortable navigating various online platforms. Students meet weekly with a teacher via video conferencing for in-person instruction to clarify the course content and receive live feedback.

Introduction to Engineering

This main campus course provides students with an overview of general engineering skills and content. Students will gain experience in conducting efficient background research, making Pugh and Gantt charts, drafting by hand and with CAD programs, keeping engineering design notebooks, and participating in the iterative design process. Content includes material properties and selection, structure design and stability, overview of mechanisms from levers, shafts, pulleys, gears, four-bar mechanisms and hydraulics, CAD and design for 3D printing, motors, basic electronics, and sensors. This course is designed for a student with no background in engineering; it is intended to be a class that exposes students to design thinking and to potentially pique student interest in additional engineering course offerings.

OC Online Advance Placement Computer Science

The AP Computer Science course is equivalent to the first semester of a college-level computer science course. The course involves developing the skills to write programs or part of programs to correctly solve specific problems. AP Computer Science also emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable, and when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the development of useful computer programs and classes is used as a context for introducing other important concepts in computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, and the study of standard algorithms and typical applications. In addition, an understanding of the basic hardware and software components of computer systems and the responsible use of these systems are integral parts of the course. Students meet weekly with a teacher via video conferencing for in-person instruction to clarify the course content and receive live feedback.

OC Online Introduction to Java

This course is an introduction to the Java programming language. The course includes an introduction of basic computer concepts such as: computers and programs, components of a computer, language history, problem solving, and programming. Java concepts presented in this course include basic input and output, variables and assignments, branches, loops, arrays, methods, objects and classes, input/output streams, and exception handling. In addition to these basic programming constructs, the course also places emphasis on disciplined program development, including incremental development, modular development, and testing/debugging. Students meet weekly with a teacher via video conferencing for in-person instruction to clarify the course content and receive live feedback.

Robotics

Students in this course will concentrate on the design, prototyping, creation, and operation of robots. Additionally, students will learn basic programming concepts and how to work in groups to accomplish a goal. Students will also learn to program and use a 3D printer. The culmination of the class will be the Vex competition in the spring, where students will compete against other schools with the robots that they have worked on throughout the school year. This class will often use the campus Makerspace.